Now showing items 1-12 of 12

  • Applied ethnomusicology: bridging research and action 

    Pettan, Svanibor (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This article provides a brief sketch of how scholars may be actively involved in conflict transformation efforts using music or the arts beyond their purely artistic connotations. Here I will explore the ways in which ...
  • Editorial 

    MAiA Editorial Team (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This is the first in an annual series of themed issues published by MAiA, and focuses on the role of the arts and music in conflict transformation and peace building
  • Editorial 

    MAiA Editorial Team (University of Exeter, 2010)
    The articles in this issue address varied fields of performance: opera, rock music, and engaged theatre. Taken together, these pieces look in detail at how individual performers, prop-makers, directors, playwrights, ...
  • “Filling out the forms was a nightmare”: project evaluation and the reflective practitioner in community theatre in Contemporary Northern Ireland 

    Jennings, Matthew; Baldwin, Andrea (University of Exeter, 2010)
    Since the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, large sums have been invested in community theatre projects in Northern Ireland, in the interests of conflict transformation and peace building. While this injection of funds has ...
  • Making opera work: bricolage and the management of dramaturgy 

    Atkinson, Paul (University of Exeter, 2010)
    Based on an ethnographic study of an international opera company, the paper reports a number of aspects of preparation, rehearsal and performance. It documents the creation of operatic productions as everyday, mundane work. ...
  • Music and art in conflict transformation: a review 

    Bergh, Arild; Sloboda, John (University of Exeter, 2010)
    Since the early 1990s, there has been an increase in the use of music and the arts within a conflict transformation context. This guest editorial discusses the developments in this research and practical area. The current ...
  • Music and conflict transformation in Bosnia: constructing and reconstructing the normal 

    Robertson, Craig (University of Exeter, 2010)
    Can music play a role in positive conflict transformation? Having developed a theoretical basis from a previous examination of the contrasting musical conflict transformation projects of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra ...
  • National identity and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra 

    Riiser, Solveig (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This article examines the role of national identity in the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, an orchestra consisting of young musicians from Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria and Iran. The article is built upon ...
  • “Peace, Salaam, Shalom”: functions of collective singing in U.S. peace activism 

    Brooks, Jeneve R. (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This article adds to the emerging literature on music and conflict transformation by highlighting the use of collective singing by U.S. peace activists when engaged in various peace movement activities. Based on preliminary ...
  • Plague and the Moonflower: a regional community celebrates the environment 

    Curtis, David John (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This paper is based on a case study of audience responses to the oratorio Plague and the Moonflower. The oratorio was performed by the community of Armidale in rural New South Wales, Australia. Through an examination of ...
  • Theatre and activism: the agit prop theatre way 

    Pal, Swati (University of Exeter, 2010)
    Agit prop or agitational propaganda, as the very term implies, seeks to deliberately change people’s beliefs through well-planned strategies of persuasion, transformations of spectators into (spect)actors, and their ...
  • Women rockers and the strategies of a minority position 

    Fournet, Adele Keala (University of Exeter, 2010)
    This article is a distillation of an ethnography conducted in the fall of 2008 of female rock instrumentalists performing in bands in the Tampa, Florida bay area. The study looked into why there are comparatively very few ...