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dc.contributor.authorMoberly, Nicholas J.
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, E.R
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-21T14:41:24Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.description.abstractThe authors conducted an experience sampling study to investigate the relationship between momentary ruminative self-focus and negative affect. Ninety-three adults recorded these variables at quasi-random intervals 8 times daily for 1 week. Scores on questionnaire measures of dispositional rumination were associated with mean levels of momentary ruminative self-focus over the experience sampling week. Concurrently, momentary ruminative self-focus was positively associated with negative affect. Cross-lagged analyses revealed that whereas ruminative self-focus predicted negative affect at a subsequent occasion, negative affect also predicted ruminative self-focus at a subsequent occasion. Decomposition of the dispositional rumination measure suggested that brooding, but not reflective pondering, was associated with higher mean levels of negative affect. Though broadly consistent with Nolen-Hoeksema's (1991) response styles theory, these results suggest that a reciprocal relationship exists between ruminative self-focus and negative affect.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Abnormal Psychology, 2008, Vol. 117, Issue 2, pp. 314 - 323en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0021-843X.117.2.314
dc.identifier.other2008-05639-006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/11324
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489207en_GB
dc.subjectAdolescenten_GB
dc.subjectAdulten_GB
dc.subjectAgeden_GB
dc.subjectAttentionen_GB
dc.subjectCultureen_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen_GB
dc.subjectDocumentationen_GB
dc.subjectEmotionsen_GB
dc.subjectFemaleen_GB
dc.subjectHumansen_GB
dc.subjectIndividualityen_GB
dc.subjectLinear Modelsen_GB
dc.subjectMaleen_GB
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subjectPersonality Inventoryen_GB
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subjectSelf Concepten_GB
dc.subjectTemperamenten_GB
dc.titleRuminative self-focus and negative affect: an experience sampling study.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2013-06-21T14:41:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0021-843X
exeter.place-of-publicationUnited States
dc.descriptionaddresses: Mood Disorder Center, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.en_GB
dc.descriptionnotes: PMCID: PMC2672047en_GB
dc.descriptiontypes: Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_GB
dc.descriptionThis is a postprint of an article published in Journal of Abnormal Psychology © 2008 copyright American Psychological Association. 'This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.' Journal of Abnormal Psychology is available online at: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/abn/index.aspxen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Abnormal Psychologyen_GB


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