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dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, ST
dc.contributor.authorJanssens, A
dc.contributor.authorSansom, A
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, L
dc.contributor.authorMars, B
dc.contributor.authorSlater, T
dc.contributor.authorMoran, P
dc.contributor.authorStallard, P
dc.contributor.authorMelluish, J
dc.contributor.authorReakes, L
dc.contributor.authorWalker, A
dc.contributor.authorAndrewartha, C
dc.contributor.authorHastings, RP
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-22T07:21:51Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-08
dc.description.abstractAn emerging body of international research suggests family caregivers may be a high-risk group for suicide, but the evidence has not been synthesised. Forty-eight peer-reviewed journal articles were included in this review, spanning low-, middle-, and high-income countries and a variety of illnesses and disabilities. The proportion of caregivers experiencing suicidal ideation ranged from 2.7% to 71%, with evidence of suicide attempts, deaths by suicide, and deaths by homicide-suicide also reported. Risk and protective factors varied across studies and there was little consideration of differences by caregiving relationship, type of illness/disability, or country. There is sufficient evidence to warrant concern for caregivers around the world and prompt action in policy and practice, but more rigorous research is required to draw clear, nuanced conclusions about risk and inform evidence-based prevention and intervention.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Bristolen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipWeston NHS Foundation Trusten_GB
dc.identifier.citationPublished online 08 July 2021, article 152261en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.comppsych.2021.152261
dc.identifier.grantnumberNIHR Applied Research Collaboration South West Peninsulaen_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberNIHR Biomedical Research Centre at University Hospitals Bristolen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/126498
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherElsevieren_GB
dc.rights© 2018 © 2021 Published by Elsevier Inc. Under a Creative Commons license, open access, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectCarersen_GB
dc.subjectCaregiversen_GB
dc.subjectSuicideen_GB
dc.subjectHomicideen_GB
dc.subjectDisabilityen_GB
dc.subjectChronic illnessen_GB
dc.titleSuicidality in family caregivers of people with long-term illnesses and disabilities: A scoping reviewen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2021-07-22T07:21:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0010-440X
exeter.article-number152261en_GB
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript; the final version is available from Elsevier via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalComprehensive Psychiatryen_GB
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/  en_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-22
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-07-08
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2021-07-22T07:12:38Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-22T07:22:28Z
refterms.panelAen_GB


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© 2018 © 2021 Published by Elsevier Inc. Under a Creative Commons license, open access, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as © 2018 © 2021 Published by Elsevier Inc. Under a Creative Commons license, open access, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/