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dc.contributor.authorGoodenough, KM
dc.contributor.authorDeady, EA
dc.contributor.authorBeard, CD
dc.contributor.authorBroom-Fendley, S
dc.contributor.authorElliott, HAL
dc.contributor.authorvan den Berg, F
dc.contributor.authorÖztürk, H
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-24T10:55:04Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-23
dc.description.abstractThe rare earth elements (REE) are critical raw materials for much of modern technology, particularly renewable energy infrastructure and electric vehicles that are vital for the energy transition. Many of the world’s largest REE deposits occur in alkaline rocks and carbonatites, which are found in intracontinental, rift-related settings, and also in syn- to post-collisional settings. Post-collisional settings host significant REE deposits, such as those of the Mianning-Dechang belt in China. This paper reviews REE mineralisation in syn- to post-collisional alkaline-carbonatite complexes worldwide, in order to demonstrate some of the key physical and chemical features of these deposits. We use three examples, in Scotland, Namibia, and Turkey, to illustrate the structure of these systems. We review published geochemical data and use these to build up a broad model for the REE mineral system in post-collisional alkaline-carbonatite complexes. It is evident that immiscibility of carbonate-rich magmas and fluids plays an important part in generating mineralisation in these settings, with REE, Ba and F partitioning into the carbonate-rich phase. The most significant REE mineralisation in post-collisional alkaline-carbonatite complexes occurs in shallow-level, carbothermal or carbonatite intrusions, but deeper carbonatite bodies and associated alteration zones may also have REE enrichment.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Union Horizon 2020en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipNatural Environment Research Council (NERC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citationPublished online 23 August 2021en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12583-021-1500-5
dc.identifier.grantnumber689909en_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberNE/R013403/1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/126853
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherSpringer / China University of Geosciences (Beijing)en_GB
dc.rights© The Authors 2021. Open access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_GB
dc.subjectpost-collisionalen_GB
dc.subjectalkalineen_GB
dc.subjectcarbonatiteen_GB
dc.subjectrare earth elementsen_GB
dc.subjecttectonicsen_GB
dc.subjectcarbon cycleen_GB
dc.titleCarbonatites and Alkaline Igneous Rocks in Post-Collisional Settings: Storehouses of Rare Earth Elementsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2021-08-24T10:55:04Z
dc.identifier.issn1674-487X
dc.descriptionThis is the final version. Available on open access from Springer via the DOI in this recorden_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Earth Scienceen_GB
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-22
exeter.funder::Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)en_GB
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-08-23
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2021-08-24T10:52:17Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-24T10:55:09Z
refterms.panelBen_GB


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© The Authors 2021. Open access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as © The Authors 2021. Open access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.