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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Beverley D.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T08:52:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-01
dc.description.abstractExpanding global populations, unequal food distribution and disease pressure suggest food poverty is increasing. Consequently, much attention is focussed on alternative natural methods in which to increase agricultural yield. Previously, it was observed that Trichoderma hamatum strain GD12 and its respective N-acetyl-β-D-Glucosamine mutant ∆Thnag:hph promoted plant biomass and fitness that, as a result, may provide a credible natural alternative to synthetic fertilisers. However, on a molecular level, the manner in which this is achieved has not been fully elucidated. In this thesis, I report the biofertiliser effect of GD12 and mutant ∆Thnag::hph once applied to autoclaved peat microcosms as sole applications. Furthermore, I demonstrate the biocontrol ability of GD12 when co-inoculated with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum or Rhizoctonia solani and reveal, that once mycelium co-inoculation has occurred, GD12 increase plant biomass and provide protection; whilst ∆Thnag::hph does not. Consequently, I challenged the biocontrol effects of Trichoderma metabolite extract where I validate that both Trichoderma wild type GD12 and mutant ∆Thnag::hph are incapable of suppressing pathogen growth. Subsequently, I characterised the up-regulated signatures associated with GD12 and ∆Thnag::hph using LC-MS techniques where unique compounds were discovered from each strain of Trichoderma. In conclusion, I provide evidence that N-acetyl-β-D-Glucosamine mutation bring about metabolomic changes that affect the fungal secretome which, in turn, alters plant phenotype, fitness and germination. Furthermore, I have shown that these effects are species specific and depend upon pathogen, plant and fungal properties. However, further investigations are needed to fully elucidate the compound(s) responsible for biocontrol and biofertilisation; especially plant-specific effects that take place as a consequence of fungal activity.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Exeteren_GB
dc.identifier.citationRyder et al (2012) Saprotrophic competitiveness and biocontrol fitness of a genetically modified strain of the plant-growth-promoting fungus Trichoderma hamatum GD12. Microbiology. 158(Pt 1), 84.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationStudholme et al (2013) Investigating the beneficial traits of Trichoderma hamatum GD12 for sustainable agriculture—insights from genomics. Frontiers in plant science. 4, 258, 1-13.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/14541
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Exeteren_GB
dc.subjectTrichoderma hamatumen_GB
dc.subjectPlant growth promotionen_GB
dc.subjectBiocontrolen_GB
dc.subjectSecondary metabolitesen_GB
dc.subjectSclerotinia sclerotiorumen_GB
dc.subjectRhizoctonia solanumen_GB
dc.subjectDiffusable metabolitesen_GB
dc.subjectGD12en_GB
dc.titleThe Molecular Characterisation of Trichoderma Hamatum Effects on Plant Growth and Biocontrolen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen_GB
dc.contributor.advisorThornton, Christopher
dc.publisher.departmentBiosciencesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitlePhD in Biological Sciencesen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_GB
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_GB


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