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dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Ross
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-10T13:46:45Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-01
dc.description.abstractEdmund Burke is often considered an arch-critic of enthusiasm in its various religious and secular forms. This article complicates this understanding by situating Burke's writings against the backdrop of eighteenth-century treatments of enthusiasm as a disturbance of the imagination. The early Burke, this article shows, was actually sympathetic to attempts by the Third Earl of Shaftesbury and others to rehabilitate enthusiasm for politics and rescue it from popular derision. Next, the author reveals how Burke firmly resisted attempts to frame anti-Protestant violence in Ireland in terms of religious delusion or enthusiasm, and was alert to the political dangers posed by policies legitimated by that framing. Finally, the article calls into question the close association often posited between the enthusiasm Burke saw in the French Revolution and earlier religious enthusiasms of the seventeenth century.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationHistory of Political Thought, 2014, Vol. 35, Number 2, pp.317-344en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/18606
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherImprint Academicen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/imp/hpt/2014/00000035/00000002/art00005en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonPublisher's policyen_GB
dc.rights© Imprint Academicen_GB
dc.titleRevisiting Burke's Critique of Enthusiasmen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0143-781X
dc.identifier.journalHistory of Political Thoughten_GB


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