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dc.contributor.authorGibbons, C
dc.contributor.authorBower, P
dc.contributor.authorLovell, K
dc.contributor.authorValderas, J
dc.contributor.authorSkevington, S
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-31T08:26:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-30
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. METHODS: We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. RESULTS: The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. CONCLUSIONS: Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by a National Institute for Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship grant (NIHR-PDF-2014-07-028) for the lead author, CG.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 18, e240en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/jmir.6053
dc.identifier.otherv18i9e240
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/33025
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherJournal of Medical Internet Researchen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27694100en_GB
dc.rights©Chris Gibbons, Peter Bower, Karina Lovell, Jose Valderas, Suzanne Skevington. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 30.09.2016. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_GB
dc.subjectAdulten_GB
dc.subjectFemaleen_GB
dc.subjectHumansen_GB
dc.subjectInterneten_GB
dc.subjectMaleen_GB
dc.subjectPsychometricsen_GB
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen_GB
dc.subjectReproducibility of Resultsen_GB
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen_GB
dc.titleElectronic Quality of Life Assessment using computer-adaptive testingen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2018-05-31T08:26:46Z
exeter.place-of-publicationCanadaen_GB
dc.descriptionThis is the final version of the article. Available from the publisher via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Medical Internet Researchen_GB


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