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dc.contributor.authorQuirmbach, D
dc.contributor.authorCornelsen, L
dc.contributor.authorJebb, SA
dc.contributor.authorMarteau, T
dc.contributor.authorSmith, R
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-12T13:40:37Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-23
dc.description.abstractBackground Taxing soft-drinks may reduce their purchase, but assessing the impact on health demands wider consideration on alternative beverage choices. Effects on alcoholic drinks are of particular concern, as many contain similar or greater amounts of sugar than soft-drinks and have additional health harms. Changes in consumption of alcoholic drinks may reinforce or negate the intended effect of price changes for soft-drinks. Methods A partial demand model, adapted from the Almost Ideal Demand System, was applied to Kantar Worldpanel data from 31 919 households from January 2012 to December 2013, covering drink purchases for home consumption, providing ~6million purchases aggregated into 11 groups, including three levels of soft-drink, three of other non-alcoholic drinks and five of alcoholic drinks. Results An increase in the price of high-sugar drinks leads to an increase in the purchase of lager, an increase in the price of medium-sugar drinks reduces purchases of alcoholic drinks, while an increase in the price of diet/ low-sugar drinks increases purchases of beer, cider and wines. Overall, the effects of price rises are greatest in the low-income group. Conclusion Increasing the price of soft-drinks may change purchase patterns for alcohol. Increasing the price of medium-sugar drinks has the potential to have a multiplier-effect beneficial to health through reducing alcohol purchases, with the converse for increases in the price of diet-drinks. Although the reasons for such associations cannot be explained from this analysis, requiring further study, the design of fiscal interventions should now consider these wider potential outcomes.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Department of Health Policy Research Programmeen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipMedical Research Council (MRC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citation, pp. jech-2017-209791 - jech-2017-209791en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2017-209791
dc.identifier.grantnumber107/0001-Policy Research Unit in Behaviour and Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberMR/L012324/1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/36417
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_GB
dc.rights© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) 2019. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_GB
dc.titleEffect of increasing the price of sugar-sweetened beverages on alcoholic beverage purchases: an economic analysis of sales dataen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2019-03-12T13:40:37Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
dc.descriptionThis is the final published version. Available from BMJ Publishing Group via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_GB
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-12-29
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-29
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2019-03-12T13:37:21Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-12T13:40:40Z
refterms.panelAen_GB
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOA


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© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which
permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially,
and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work
is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/
licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) 2019. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/