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dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Louise J
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-01T10:54:15Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.description.abstractThis article attempts to address a certain lack of interest in the senses in New Testament Studies by conducting a sensory survey of the Gospel of Mark. Informed by cross-cultural anthropology of the senses, the Gospel of Mark is revealed as an audio-centric text in which hearing is the pre-eminent sense and deafness the gravest sensory impairment. Mark’s ambivalence surrounding the faculty of sight is viewed as a resistance to the pre-eminence of the visual within imperial propaganda.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 33, No. 4, pp.387-397en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0142064X11404602
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/8802
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://jnt.sagepub.com/content/33/4/387en_GB
dc.subjectSenses
dc.subjectSight
dc.subjectBlindness
dc.subjectHearing
dc.subjectDeafness
dc.subjectImperial propaganda
dc.titleExploring the Sense-scape of the Gospel of Marken_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-01T10:54:15Z
dc.identifier.issn0142-064X
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2011 SAGE Publicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.eissn1745-5294
dc.identifier.journalJournal for the Study of the New Testamenten_GB


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