Decentring and distraction reduce overgeneral autobiographical memory in depression

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Decentring and distraction reduce overgeneral autobiographical memory in depression

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dc.contributor.author Watkins, E.R en_GB
dc.contributor.author Teasdale, J.D en_GB
dc.contributor.author Williams, R.M en_GB
dc.contributor.department University of Exeter (Watkins). At the time of publication, the author was at the Institute of Psychiatry, London en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2008-10-03T13:24:09Z en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-25T12:00:37Z en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-20T14:53:46Z
dc.date.issued 2000-07 en_GB
dc.description.abstract Background. Increased recall of categorical autobiographical memories is a phenomenon unique to depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, and is associated with a poor prognosis for depression. Although the elevated recall of categorical memories does not change on remission from depression, recent findings suggest that overgeneral memory may be reduced by cognitive interventions and maintained by rumination. This study tested whether cognitive manipulations could influence the recall of categorical memories in dysphoric participants. Methods. Forty-eight dysphoric and depressed participants were randomly allocated to rumination or distraction conditions. Before and after the manipulation, participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test, a standard measure of overgeneral memory. Participants were then randomized to either a ‘decentring’ question (Socratic questions designed to facilitate viewing moods within a wider perspective) or a control question condition, before completing the Autobiographical Memory Test again. Results. Distraction produced significantly greater decreases in the proportion of memories retrieved that were categorical than rumination. Decentring questions produced significantly greater decreases in the proportion of memories retrieved that were categorical than control questions, with this effect independent of the prior manipulation. Conclusions. Elevated categorical memory in depression is more modifiable than has been previously assumed; it may reflect the dynamic maintenance of a cognitive style that can be interrupted by brief cognitive interventions. en_GB
dc.identifier.citation Psychological Medicine, 2000, 30 (4), 911-920 en_GB
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10036/38509 en_GB
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en_GB
dc.relation.url http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_PSM en_GB
dc.subject Depression en_GB
dc.subject Autobiographical memory en_GB
dc.subject Overgeneral memory en_GB
dc.subject Decentring en_GB
dc.subject Distraction en_GB
dc.title Decentring and distraction reduce overgeneral autobiographical memory in depression en_GB
dc.type Article en_GB
dc.date.available 2008-10-03T13:24:09Z en_GB
dc.date.available 2011-01-25T12:00:37Z en_US
dc.date.available 2013-03-20T14:53:46Z
dc.identifier.issn 0033-2917 en_GB
dc.description © Cambridge University Press 2000. Reprinted with permission. en_GB
dc.identifier.eissn 1469-8978 en_GB
dc.identifier.journal Psychological Medicine en_GB


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