Cost-effectiveness of a primary care based physical activity intervention in 45-74 year old men and women: a randomised controlled trial.

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Cost-effectiveness of a primary care based physical activity intervention in 45-74 year old men and women: a randomised controlled trial.

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dc.contributor.author Stevens, W. en_GB
dc.contributor.author Hillsdon, Melvyn en_GB
dc.contributor.author Thorogood, Margaret en_GB
dc.contributor.author McArdle, D. en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-09T16:46:43Z en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-25T12:07:32Z en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-20T15:05:48Z
dc.date.issued 1998-09 en_GB
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of a primary care based intervention aimed at increasing levels of physical activity in inactive people aged 45-74. METHODS: A total of 714 inactive people aged 45-74, taken from two west London general practices, were randomised into two groups. Intervention subjects were invited to a consultation with an exercise development officer, and offered a personalised 10 week programme to increase their level of regular physical activity, combining leisure centre and home based activities. Control subjects were sent information on local leisure centres. All subjects were followed up at eight months. RESULTS: There was a net 10.6% (95% confidence interval 4.5 to 16.9%) reduction in the proportion of people classified as sedentary in the intervention group compared with the control group, eight months after the intervention. The intervention group also reported an increase in the mean number of episodes of physical activity per week, as compared with the control group (an additional 1.52 episodes (95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.95)). The cost of moving a person out of the sedentary group was shown to be less than 650 Pounds. The cost of moving someone to the now commonly recommended level was estimated at almost 2500 Pounds. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate physical activity can be successfully encouraged in previously sedentary men and women aged 45-74 through a primary care based intervention. The process of recruitment was the most important variable cost. A high uptake rate would maximise cost-effectiveness, and sensitivity analysis suggests that unit costs could be halved with a more effective recruitment strategy. en_GB
dc.description.sponsorship This trial was supported by West London Health Promotion Agency through a grant awarded by North Thames NHS Executive Responsive Funding programme (RFG013) en_GB
dc.identifier.citation 32 (3) pp236-241 en_GB
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bjsm.32.3.236 en_GB
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10036/93961 en_GB
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en_GB
dc.relation.url http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/32/3/236.abstract en_GB
dc.relation.url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1756094/ en_GB
dc.subject physical activity promotion en_GB
dc.subject primary care en_GB
dc.subject middle aged en_GB
dc.title Cost-effectiveness of a primary care based physical activity intervention in 45-74 year old men and women: a randomised controlled trial. en_GB
dc.type Article en_GB
dc.date.available 2010-03-09T16:46:43Z en_GB
dc.date.available 2011-01-25T12:07:32Z en_US
dc.date.available 2013-03-20T15:05:48Z
dc.identifier.issn 03063674 en_GB
dc.description The article was first published in:British Journal of Sports Medicine 1998:32:236-241. en_GB
dc.identifier.journal British Journal of Sports Medicine en_GB


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