Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

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Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/104626

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Title: Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux
Author: Stabler, Richard A.
Dawson, Lisa F.
Oyston, Petra C. F.
Titball, Richard W.
Wade, Jim
Hinds, Jason
Witney, Adam A.
Wren, Brendan W.
Citation: 8, article 177
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: BMC Microbiology
Date Issued: 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/104626
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-8-177
Links: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/8/177 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-8-177
Abstract: Background: Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP) oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results: The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage), virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance) and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin). Conclusion: The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately.
Type: Article
Description: © 2008 Stabler et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
ISSN: 1471-2180


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