Inclusive Education and Integrated Working: An Exploration of the Transition into Care for Young People in Key Stage 4

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Inclusive Education and Integrated Working: An Exploration of the Transition into Care for Young People in Key Stage 4

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Title: Inclusive Education and Integrated Working: An Exploration of the Transition into Care for Young People in Key Stage 4
Author: Woodland, Maryanne
Advisor: Tunbridge, MargieMacleod, Flora
Publisher: University of Exeter
Date Issued: 2010-05-28
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3033
Abstract: Paper 1 - Integrated Working and the Personal Education Plan: An Exploration of the Transition into Care for Young People in Key Stage 4 Abstract The Social Care and Education systems have undergone major reform in recent years, papers such as the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2003) and The Children’s Plan (DCSF, 2007) have acted as political drivers for the identification of children in care as an vulnerable group within education. In addition, the need for effective integrated working has been identified as a key area of development in terms of professional practice. The Personal Education Plan has been identified as a vehicle for raising attainment and promoting integrated working, however, the process of engaging in the Personal Education Plan has remained relatively unexplored. This study reports a qualitative exploration of integrated working in the support of young people entering care in Key Stage 4. The study specifically explored transition, integrated working and the application of psychology within this process. Data was collected using focus groups and interviews to elicit the views of the professionals who engage in supporting young people entering care. Data was analysed using Thematic Analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The findings of the study identify the successive nature of changes experienced by the young person entering care as potentially detrimental to him/her and the supporting professionals. Findings from the study suggest that professionals supporting young people in care experience ambivalence regarding the usefulness of the PEP Personal Education Plan. The competent management of change, acknowledgement of psychosocial implications and effective group working were identified as areas of development for young people entering care and for the professionals supporting them. In addition, the study found that the knowledge and experience of Educational Psychologists’ is an under utilised but potentially valuable resource. Paper 2 - Inclusive Education and the Personal Education Plan: An Exploration of the Support for Young People Entering Care in Key Stage 4 Abstract The education system has undergone major reform in recent years, papers such as the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2003) and The Children’s Plan (DCSF, 2007) have instigated a re-evaluation of the process and context of the education system. One of the major implications of this reform has been the need to identify any groups within the population who underachieve educationally with the intention of providing additional support. The role of designated teacher and use of the Personal Education Plan has been established within school settings, however, the process of supporting young people entering care within college settings has remained relatively unexplored. This study reports a qualitative exploration of core subject teachers in the support of young people entering care in Key Stage 4. The study specifically explored professional engagement in the Personal Education Plan, classroom practice and support of young people entering care. Data was collected using focus groups to elicit the views of the professionals who teach young people entering care. Data was analysed using Thematic Analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The findings of the study suggest that teaching staff identify individual need in response to conflict (in the form of response to presenting behaviour within school). The nature of additional need identified within the study was predominantly psychosocial. Additional support is therefore reactive. The dichotomy between inclusive legislation and practice is explored Teachers identified the need for a proactive response to supporting young people in care as an area for development at both the individual and systemic level. Future considerations for the application of psychology and research are identified.
Type: Thesis or dissertation
Keywords: LACChildren in carepersonal education plankey stage 4multi agency working


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