The Mediational Effect of Self-Regulatory Capacity on the Relationship Between Temperament, Childhood Invalidation and Interpersonal Functioning: Testing a New Neuro-Regulatory Model.

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The Mediational Effect of Self-Regulatory Capacity on the Relationship Between Temperament, Childhood Invalidation and Interpersonal Functioning: Testing a New Neuro-Regulatory Model.

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dc.contributor.author Nash, Claire-Louise en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-06T08:43:22Z en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-21T11:42:25Z
dc.date.issued 2012-05-08 en_US
dc.description.abstract Based on existing theories of personality and socio-emotional functioning (e.g. Clark, 2005; Lynch, Hempel & Clark, in press) a new model is proposed and tested. The model hypothesises that (i) temperament (reward and threat sensitivity) and childhood invalidation predict problems with interpersonal functioning, (ii) this effect is mediated by self-regulatory capacity; where self-regulatory capacity comprises self-control (ranging from emotional over-control to emotional under-control) and flexible control and (iii) self-regulatory capacity itself has a quadratic relationship with interpersonal functioning. A UK community sample (n= 512) completed a self-report survey, measuring each of the aforementioned latent variables. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to determine the goodness-of-fit of this and variations of this model. SEM identified that a non-mediation model provided the best fit (χ²=49.403, p< 0.001; CFI=0.98; RMSEA=0.056). Good-fit was obtained for a model including flexible control as a partial mediator (χ²=269.06, p< 0.001; CFI=0.956; RMSEA=0.081) and adequate-fit for a model including over-control as a partial mediator (χ²= 91.744, p < 0.001, CFI=0.932; RMSEA= 0.096). Correlation analyses suggested that over-control and under-control correlated positively with interpersonal problems. Results from SEM provided promising initial evidence for the mediating role of self-regulatory capacity, particularly for the flexible control component. Correlation analyses provided support for the non-linear relationship between self-regulatory capacity and interpersonal functioning, whereby extreme over-control or extreme under-control is associated with interpersonal problems. Findings have implications for identifying mechanisms of change for therapeutic approaches to emotion dysregulation and for understanding the over-controlled population, which has previously been overlooked. en_GB
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3721 en_US
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher University of Exeter en_GB
dc.subject socio-emotional functioning; threat and reward sensitivity; self-regulatory capacity; personality; childhood invalidation en_GB
dc.title The Mediational Effect of Self-Regulatory Capacity on the Relationship Between Temperament, Childhood Invalidation and Interpersonal Functioning: Testing a New Neuro-Regulatory Model. en_GB
dc.type Thesis or dissertation en_GB
dc.date.available 2012-09-06T08:43:22Z en_US
dc.date.available 2013-03-21T11:42:25Z
dc.contributor.advisor Lynch, Thomas en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Hempel, Roelie en_US
dc.contributor.advisor O'Mahen, Heather en_US
dc.publisher.department Psychology en_GB
dc.type.degreetitle Doctorate in Clinical Psychology en_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_GB
dc.type.qualificationname DClinPsych en_GB


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