Frequency and Density-Dependent Selection on Life-History Strategies – A Field Experiment

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Frequency and Density-Dependent Selection on Life-History Strategies – A Field Experiment

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/38257

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Title: Frequency and Density-Dependent Selection on Life-History Strategies – A Field Experiment
Author: Mappes, Tapio
Koivula, Minna
Koskela, Esa
Oksanen, Tuula A.
Savolainen, Tiina
Sinervo, Barry
Tregenza, Tom
Citation: PLoS ONE 2008 3(2)
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Journal: PLoS ONE
Date Issued: 2008-02-27
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/38257
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001687
Abstract: Negative frequency-dependence, which favors rare genotypes, promotes the maintenance of genetic variability and is of interest as a potential explanation for genetic differentiation. Density-dependent selection may also promote cyclic changes in frequencies of genotypes. Here we show evidence for both density-dependent and negative frequency-dependent selection on opposite life-history tactics (low or high reproductive effort, RE) in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). Density-dependent selection was evident among the females with low RE, which were especially favored in low densities. Instead, both negative frequency-dependent and density-dependent selection were shown in females with high RE, which were most successful when they were rare in high densities. Furthermore, selection at the individual level affected the frequencies of tactics at the population level, so that the frequency of the rare high RE tactic increased significantly at high densities. We hypothesize that these two selection mechanisms (density- and negative frequency-dependent selection) may promote genetic variability in cyclic mammal populations. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined whether the origin of genetic variance in life-history traits is causally related to density variation (e.g. population cycles).
Type: Article
ISSN: 1932-6203
PubMed ID: 18301764
PubMed Central ID: 2246017
Rights: Mappes et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


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