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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Angeliqueen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T14:22:37Zen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-20T13:56:54Z
dc.date.issued2010en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis article compares the open-ended Darwinism of Charles Darwin, George Lewes, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy with reductive post-Weismann and early eugenist views and more recent neo-Darwinian ideas including literary Darwinism. It argues that some Victorians had a clear sense of the complexities of the natural world, and of the centrality of environment to life. This awareness contrasts with the processes of divorce and isolation that underpin neo-Darwinian understandings of evolutionary development. But biologists and philosophers of biology are now emphasising the complex and dynamic relations between organism and environment in ways that would have appealed to Darwin's contemporaries. The article establishes that there are significant parallels between mid-Victorian and postgenomic thought.en_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 ed., Vol. 11en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10036/4104en_GB
dc.publisherBirkbeck, University of Londonen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://19.bbk.ac.uk/index.php/19/article/view/583en_GB
dc.titleDarwin and Reductionisms: Victorian, Neo-Darwinian and Postgenomic Biologiesen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2013-01-03T14:22:37Zen_GB
dc.date.available2013-03-20T13:56:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1755-1560en_GB
dc.identifier.journal19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Nineteenth Centuryen_GB


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