Custom and habit(us): The meaning of traditions and legends in early medieval western Britain

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Custom and habit(us): The meaning of traditions and legends in early medieval western Britain

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dc.contributor.author Harvey, David en_GB
dc.contributor.author Jones, Rhys en_GB
dc.contributor.department University of Exeter (David Harvey) en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2009-01-14T16:43:40Z en_GB
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-25T10:39:01Z en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-20T14:30:25Z
dc.date.issued 1999 en_GB
dc.description.abstract This paper discusses some well-known legends and hagiographic stories, and explores the context of their production and consumption. From an examination of Welsh foundation legends and Cornish hagiographical accounts, we focus on the methods by which versions of history were used in the Middle Ages to provide a context for fundamental changes in the way in which society was organised. It is found that, far from abandoning traditional versions of history, accounts of the past were promoted that sought to couch newer territorial notions of organisation within existing constructions of identity and mediations with the past. In an examination of the production and reception of these popular stories, we attempt to relate the legends to the generation of communal identity and memory. Consequently, drawing on Bourdieu's notion of habitus, we argue that pre-existing beliefs and customs were an important part in the development of newer institutional structures. Rather than initiating new practices that had no grounding in any particular past, institutional developments gained social currency by being inherently grounded in existing facets of cultural identity. In essence therefore, changing societal and institutional structures were unintentionally couched in the language and understandings of existing structures, so that in many ways a concept of continuity was at the very heart of actual change. en_GB
dc.identifier.citation Geografiska Annaler, Series B: Human Geography 81 (4), 1999: pp. 223-233 en_GB
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10036/47385 en_GB
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd en_GB
dc.relation.url www.blackwell-synergy.com en_GB
dc.subject legends en_GB
dc.subject medieval western Britain en_GB
dc.title Custom and habit(us): The meaning of traditions and legends in early medieval western Britain en_GB
dc.type Article en_GB
dc.date.available 2009-01-14T16:43:40Z en_GB
dc.date.available 2011-01-25T10:39:01Z en_US
dc.date.available 2013-03-20T14:30:25Z
dc.identifier.issn 0435-3684 en_GB
dc.description This a post-print, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Geografiska Annaler, Series B: Human Geography. Copyright © Blackwell publishing 1999. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com en_GB
dc.identifier.eissn 1468-0467 en_GB
dc.identifier.journal Geografiska Annaler, Series B: Human Geography en_GB


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