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dc.contributor.authorRichards, David
dc.contributor.authorBorglin, G
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-11T13:56:02Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Worldwide, health systems are improving access to empirically supported psychological therapies for anxiety and depression. Evaluations of this effort are limited by the cross sectional nature of studies, short implementation periods, poor data completeness rates and lack of clinically significant and reliable change metrics. Objective: Assess the impact of implementing stepped care empirically supported psychological therapies by measuring the prospective outcomes of patients referred over a two year period to one Improving Access to Psychological Therapies service in the UK. Method: We collected demographic, therapeutic and outcome data on depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-7) from 7,859 consecutive patients for 24 months between1st July 2006 and 31st August 2008, following up these patients for a further one year. Results: 4,183 patients (53%) received two or more treatment sessions. Uncontrolled effect size for depression was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.88 to 1.29) and for anxiety was 1.04 (0.88 to 1.23). 55.4% of treated patients met reliable improvement or reliable and clinically significant change criteria for depression, 54.7% for anxiety. Patients received a mean of 5.5 sessions over 3.5 hours, mainly low-intensity CBT and phone based case management. Attrition was high with 47% of referrals either not attending for an assessment or receiving an assessment only. Conclusions: Recovery rates for patients receiving stepped care empirically supported treatments for anxiety and depression in routine practice are 40 to 46%. Only half of all patients referred go on to receive treatment. Further work is needed to improve routine engagement of patients with anxiety and depression.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Affective Disorders, 2011, Vol. 133, Issue 1, pp. 51 - 60en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2011.03.024
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/10221
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherElsevieren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032711001078en_GB
dc.subjectpsychological therapyen_GB
dc.subjectaccessen_GB
dc.subjectprospectiveen_GB
dc.subjectstepped careen_GB
dc.subjectimplementation researchen_GB
dc.subjectanxiety and depressionen_GB
dc.subjectcohort studyen_GB
dc.subjectreliable and clinically significant changeen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of Psychological Therapies for Anxiety and Depression in Routine Practice: Two Year Prospective Cohort Studyen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2013-06-11T13:56:02Z
dc.descriptionpublication-status: Publisheden_GB
dc.descriptiontypes: Articleen_GB
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2011 Elsevier. NOTICE: This is the author’s version of a work accepted for publication by Elsevier. Changes resulting from the publishing process, including peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting and other quality control mechanisms, may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published Journal of Affective Disorders, 2011, Vol. 133, Issue 1, pp. 51 - 60 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.03.024en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Affective Disordersen_GB


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