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dc.contributor.authorHynd, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-10T09:26:58Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.description.abstractChild soldiers are often viewed as a contemporary, ‘new war’ phenomenon but international concern about their use first emerged in response to anti-colonial liberation struggles. Youth were important actors in anti-colonial insurgencies, but their involvement has been neglected in existing historiographies of decolonization and counterinsurgency due to the absence and marginalization of youth voices in colonial archives. This article analyses the causes of youth insurgency and colonial counterinsurgency responses to their involvement in conflict between c.1945 and 1960, particularly comparing Kenya and Cyprus, but also drawing on evidence from Malaya, Indochina/Vietnam, and Algeria. It takes a generational lens, exploring the experiences of ‘youth insurgents’ primarily between the ages of twelve and twenty. Youth insurgents were most common where the legitimate grievances of youth were mobilized by anti-colonial groups who could recruit children through colonial organizations as well as family and social networks. Whilst some teenagers fought from coercion or necessity, others were politically motivated and willing to risk their lives for independence. Youth soldiers served in multiple capacities in insurgencies, from protestors to couriers to armed fighters, in roles which were shaped by multiple logics: the need for troop fortification and sustained manpower; the tactical exploitation of youth liminality, and the symbolic mobilization of childhood and discourses of childhood innocence. Counterinsurgency responses to youthful insurgents commonly combined violence and development, highlighting tensions within late colonial governance: juveniles were beaten, detained, and flogged, but also constructed as ‘delinquents’ rather than ‘terrorists’ to facilitate their subsequent ‘rehabilitation’.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipBritish Academyen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citationAwaiting citation and DOI. Forthcoming in Vol. 62.4en_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberSG120946en_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberExeter development Fund- 142027en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/121349
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder temporary indefinite embargo pending publication. No embargo required on publication. Published version may be archived.en_GB
dc.subjectyouthen_GB
dc.subjectchildhooden_GB
dc.subjectgenerationen_GB
dc.subjectchild soldieren_GB
dc.subjectinsurgencyen_GB
dc.subjectcolonialen_GB
dc.subjectdecolonizationen_GB
dc.subjectKenyaen_GB
dc.subjectCyprusen_GB
dc.subjectcounterinsurgencyen_GB
dc.titleSmall warriors? Children and youth in colonial insurgencies and counterinsurgency, ca. 1945–1960en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2020-06-10T09:26:58Z
dc.identifier.issn0010-4175
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscripten_GB
dc.identifier.journalComparative Studies in Society and Historyen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-10
exeter.funder::British Academyen_GB
exeter.funder::Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05-10
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2020-06-09T18:43:11Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelDen_GB


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