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dc.contributor.authorLiebl, AL
dc.contributor.authorBrowning, LE
dc.contributor.authorRussell, AF
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T08:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.description.abstractExperiments designed to quantify the effects of increasing numbers of carers on levels of offspring care are rare in cooperative breeding systems, where offspring are reared by individuals additional to the breeding pair. This paucity might stem from disagreement over the most appropriate manipulations necessary to elucidate these effects. Here we perform both carer removal and brood enhancement experiments to test the effects of numbers of carers and carer: offspring ratios on provisioning rates in the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps). Removing carers caused linear reductions in overall brood provisioning rates. We found no evidence to suggest that this effect was influenced by territory quality or disruption of group dynamics stemming from the removals. Likewise, adding nestlings to broods caused linear increases in brood provisioning rates, suggesting carers are responsive to increasing offspring demand. However, the two experiments did not generate quantitatively equivalent results: each nestling received more food following brood size manipulation than carer removal, despite comparable carer: offspring ratios in each. Following an at-hatching split-design cross-fostering manipulation to break any links between pre-hatching maternal effects and post-hatching begging patterns, we found that begging intensity increased in larger broods after controlling for metrics of hunger. These findings suggest that manipulation of brood size can, in itself, influence nestling provisioning rates when begging intensity is affected by scramble competition. We highlight that carer number and brood size manipulations are complimentary but not equivalent; adopting both can yield greater overall insight into carer effects in cooperative breeding systemsen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to Simon Griffith, Keith Leggett, and the Dowling family for logistical support. For help with fieldwork, we thank: Elena Berg, Elliot Capp, Matthew Creasey, Hannah Fitzjohn, Tom Harris, Sam Patrick, James Savage, Niall Stopford, and Beth Woodward. The project was funded by grants to AFR from the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant (AFR: DP0774080 and DP1094295) and Natural Environment Research Council (AFR: NE/K005766/1).en_GB
dc.identifier.citationFirst published online: March 28, 2016
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/arw038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/20394
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/03/28/beheco.arw038.full
dc.rightsThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Oxford University Press via the DOI in this record.
dc.subjectcooperative breedingen_GB
dc.subjectdisruption hypothesisen_GB
dc.subjecthelper effecten_GB
dc.subjectscramble competitionen_GB
dc.subjectterritory qualityen_GB
dc.titleCarer removal and brood size manipulation: not equivalent to quantify carer impacts on provisioningen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1465-7279
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article published as "Manipulating carer number versus brood size: complementary but not equivalent ways of quantifying carer effects on offspring".
dc.identifier.journalBehavioral Ecologyen_GB


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