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dc.contributor.authorLloyd, JJ
dc.contributor.authorWyatt, KM
dc.contributor.authorCreanor, S
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T12:51:52Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To assess the behavioural and weight status outcomes in English children in a feasibility study of a novel primary school-based obesity prevention programme. DESIGN: Exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme. SETTING: Four city primary schools (two control and two intervention) in the South West of England. PARTICIPANTS: 202 children aged 9-10 years, of whom 193 and 188 were followed up at 18 and 24 months, respectively. No child was excluded from the study; however, to be eligible, schools were required to have at least one single Year 5 class. INTERVENTION: Four-phase multicomponent programme using a range of school-based activities including lessons, assemblies, parents' evenings, interactive drama workshops and goal setting to engage and support schools, children and their families in healthy lifestyle behaviours. It runs over the spring and summer term of Year 5 and the autumn term of Year 6. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Weight status outcomes were body mass index, waist circumference and body fat standard deviation scores (SDS) at 18 and 24 months, and behavioural outcomes were physical activity, television (TV) viewing/screen time and food intake at 18 months. RESULTS: At 18 months of follow-up, intervention children consumed less energy-dense snacks and more healthy snacks; had less 'negative food markers', more 'positive food markers', lower mean TV/screen time and spent more time doing moderate-vigorous physical activity each day than those in the control schools. Intervention children had lower anthropometric measures at 18 and 24 months than control children, with larger differences at 24 months than at 18 months for nearly all measures. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this exploratory trial show consistent positive changes in favour of the intervention across all targeted behaviours, which, in turn, appear to affect weight status and body shape. A definitive trial is now justified.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Exploratory Trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research for Patient Benefit Programme. JLL and KMW were partially supported by PenCLAHRC, the NIHR CLAHRC for the Southwest Peninsula. This paper presents independent research commissioned by the NIHR. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 2: e000390.en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000390
dc.identifier.otherbmjopen-2011-000390
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/25461
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22586282en_GB
dc.rightsThis final article is available for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 2.0 Licence; see http://bmjopen.bmj.comen_GB
dc.titleBehavioural and weight status outcomes from an exploratory trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP): a novel school-based obesity prevention programme.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2017-01-30T12:51:52Z
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
exeter.place-of-publicationEnglanden_GB
dc.descriptionThis is the final version of the article. Available from the publisher via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen_GB
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3358612
dc.identifier.pmid22586282


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