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dc.contributor.authorPhillips, BG
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-26T14:43:45Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.description.abstractIn the decades before the collapse of Tsarism in 1917, no issue did more to galvanize British support for the Russian revolutionary movement than the mistreatment of political exiles in Siberia. In popular literature, journalism and Polish and Russian émigré propaganda, Siberian exile was seen as synonymous with the iniquities of autocratic rule in Russia and was represented as a battleground upon which the forces of civilisation and barbarism contested Russia’s future as a European (or non-European) nation. As Siberia captured the popular imagination, the heroic figure of the revolutionary exile-martyr became not only symbolic of the anti-Tsarist struggle, but a projection of the Western self.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationAwaiting citation and DOIen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/36075
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studiesen_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder temporary indefinite embargo pending publication by University College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studies. 24 month embargo to be applied on publication.
dc.title'A Nihilist Kurort': Siberian Exile in the Victorian Imagination, c. 1830-1890en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2019-02-26T14:43:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0037-6795
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalSlavonic and East European Reviewen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-21
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-21
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2019-02-26T14:24:50Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelDen_GB


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