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dc.contributor.authorKember, J
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-05T14:53:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-23
dc.description.abstractThe lantern lecturing business diversified in a number of ways in the second half of the nineteenth century. At the bottom end of one kind of cultural scale were individuals that we now might think of as ‘citizen-scientists’ (or citizen-litterateurs, -travellers, -art historians, - church historians, -entertainers &c.), who were often to be found filling schedules within local literary and mechanics’ institutes, or, as these organisations gradually declined between the 1850s and 1890s, within museums, libraries, or local history and photographic societies. By contrast, the business of ‘popular lecturers’ – of speakers who could be relied upon to fill venues wherever they travelled – was a fully commercialised concern: theirs was a market increasingly dominated by discourses of celebrity; they tended to visit not only the usual run of lecturing institutes but also major town halls, theatres, and concert halls, and they frequently embarked on both national and international tours, a scale of enterprise that usually necessitated a support network comprising lecture agencies, managers, and impresarios. This article considers the work of three such agencies, whose networks incorporated much of the Anglophone world for over five decades: Major James Pond’s lecture bureau in the United States, Gerald Christy’s Lecture Agency in Britain, and R.S. and Carlyle Smythe’s lecture management business, which stretched from South Africa to New Zealand. Beginning by tracing the emergence of centralised popular lecturing systems in the United States and Britain from the 1850s, the article then discusses the emergence and consolidation of these three businesses between the 1860s and 1920s, arguing that they should be regarded as key mobilisers of the global trade in celebrity lantern lecturing. The article describes for the first time the global foundations for the top end of the lantern business, and for lecturing practices that would come to be regarded as high status across international lantern cultures.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipArts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Councilen_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 17 (3-4), pp. 79-303en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17460654.2019.1702180
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/39983
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder embargo until 23 June 2021 in compliance with publisher policyen_GB
dc.rights© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectMajor James Ponden_GB
dc.subjectGerald Christyen_GB
dc.subjectR.S. Smytheen_GB
dc.subjectCarlyle Smytheen_GB
dc.subjectlantern lectureen_GB
dc.subjectlecture agencyen_GB
dc.subjectnetworksen_GB
dc.subjectlecture brokerageen_GB
dc.subjectnetwork capitalen_GB
dc.subjectmobilitiesen_GB
dc.titleThe lecture-brokers: the role of impresarios and agencies in the global Anglophone circuit for lantern lecturing, 1850-1920en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2019-12-05T14:53:41Z
dc.identifier.issn1746-0654
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Taylor & Francis via the DOI in this recorden_GB
dc.identifier.journalEarly Popular Visual Cultureen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-04
exeter.funder::Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)en_GB
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-04
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2019-12-05T12:48:09Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelDen_GB


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