Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against Murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against Murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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Title: Role of T cells in innate and adaptive immunity against Murine Burkholderia pseudomallei infection
Author: Haque, Ashraful
Easton, Anna
Smith, Debbie
O'Garra, Anne
Van Rooijen, Nico
Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana
Titball, Richard W.
Bancroft, Gregory J.
Citation: 193 (3), pp. 370-379
Publisher: Published by University of Chicago Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Journal: The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Date Issued: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/47046
DOI: 10.1086/498983
Links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/498983 http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/498983
Abstract: Antigen-specific T cells are important sources of interferon (IFN)–γ for acquired immunity to intracellular pathogens, but they can also produce IFN-γ directly via a “bystander” activation pathway in response to proinflammatory cytokines. We investigated the in vivo role of cytokine- versus antigen-mediated T cell activation in resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)–12, and IL-18 were essential for initial bacterial control in infected mice. B. pseudomallei infection rapidly generated a potent IFN-γ response from natural killer (NK) cells, NK T cells, conventional T cells, and other cell types within 16 h after infection, in an IL-12– and IL-18–dependent manner. However, early T cell– and NK cell–derived IFN-γ responses were functionally redundant in cell depletion studies, with IFN-γ produced by other cell types, such as major histocompatibility complex class IIint F4/80+ macrophages being sufficient for initial resistance. In contrast, B. pseudomallei–specific CD4+ T cells played an important role during the later stage of infection. Thus, the T cell response to primary B. pseudomallei infection is biphasic, an early cytokine-induced phase in which T cells appear to be functionally redundant for initial bacterial clearance, followed by a later antigen-induced phase in which B. pseudomallei–specific T cells, in particular CD4+ T cells, are important for host resistance.
Type: Article
Description: © 2005 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
ISSN: 0022-18991537-6613


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