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dc.contributor.authorRappert, B
dc.contributor.authorWheat, D
dc.contributor.authorWilson-Kovacs, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T13:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-01
dc.description.abstractWith the growing sophistication and prevalence of digital devices such as mobile phones, computers, tablets, sat-navs, and domestic appliances, the extraction, analysis and interpretation of digital data has become increasingly central to intelligence gathering and criminal proceedings. However, the very extent of data available today challenges the ability of police agencies to turn seized devices into useful evidence. To date, most social science scholarship about forensics has concentrated on DNA profiling and its societal and ethical issues. In contrast, other forensic fields, including digital forensics, have had little analytical scrutiny. Based on unprecedented access to a forensic collaboration in England, this study addresses the question: In conditions of constrained resources, how do police agencies manage the insatiable demand for digital examinations? In doing so, we bring rationing classification schemes from healthcare studies into the field of criminology in order to characterise the techniques for reconciling demand with capacity. As detailed, formal attempts to ration demand are confounded by informal practices and procedures that can impact on the capacity of the workforce and the speed with which cases are processed. In addition, the rationing of digital devices has significant consequences for the definition and distribution of skills and expertise across criminal justice agencies.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citationPublished online 1 July 2020en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10439463.2020.1788026
dc.identifier.grantnumberES/R00742X/1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/121581
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder embargo until 1 January 2022 in compliance with publisher policyen_GB
dc.rights© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectdigital forensicsen_GB
dc.subjectrationingen_GB
dc.subjectEnglanden_GB
dc.subjectdigital policingen_GB
dc.titleRationing bytes: managing demand for digital forensic examinationsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2020-06-22T13:30:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1043-9463
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Taylor & Francis via the DOI in this recorden_GB
dc.identifier.journalPolicing and Societyen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-19
exeter.funder::Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06-19
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2020-06-21T14:47:20Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelCen_GB


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