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dc.contributor.authorAnkeny, RA
dc.contributor.authorLeonelli, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T14:04:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-12
dc.description.abstractIn the last three decades of the twentieth century, scientists working in coral reef biology documented unprecedented and extensive changes and degradation of reefs worldwide. This chapter investigates the evolution of coral reef biology research during this critical period, focusing on the emergence and use in the field of an “infection repertoire” which as we document was borrowed from biomedical research. Coral reef biology researchers borrowed and used this repertoire, recognizing and leveraging critical institutional factors such as strategies to align their research with national and global funding priorities, as well as managerial decisions concerning the set-up, infrastructures, and technologies to be prioritized for the production and circulation of data. These institutional and managerial characteristics were as crucial to emerging approaches in the field of coral reef biology as were the conceptual and methodological factors relating to the identification and investigation of the causes of the changes being observed. The fruitfulness of the diseaserelated explanation of reef damage was not a serendipitous outcome of the application of a theoretical framework, but rather a well-engineered and deliberate choice made by a coalition of marine researchers who actively decided to reproduce a certain way of organizing and conducting research. The field of coral reef research presents an intriguing domain to study to reflect on practices in marine biology, given its rapid evolution in recent years and because it has involved researchers from multiple disciplines working together, importing and adapting resources (including repertoires) from other fields in ways that significantly impacted ongoing research.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Councilen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Research Council (ERC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citationIn: Why Study Biology by the Sea?, edited By Karl S. Matlin, Jane Maienschein, and Rachel A. Ankeny. Chapter 10en_GB
dc.identifier.grantnumberDP160102989en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/121737
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttps://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/W/bo45713361.htmlen_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder temporary embargo pending publisher permissionen_GB
dc.rights© 2020 University of Chicago Pressen_GB
dc.subjectcoral reef researchen_GB
dc.subjectrepertoiresen_GB
dc.subjectscientific practiceen_GB
dc.subjectscientific changeen_GB
dc.titleUsing Repertoires to Explore Changing Practices in Recent Coral Researchen_GB
dc.typeBook chapteren_GB
dc.date.available2020-07-01T14:04:00Z
dc.contributor.editorMatlin, KSen_GB
dc.contributor.editorMaienschein, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.editorAnkeny, RAen_GB
dc.identifier.isbn022667309X
dc.identifier.isbn9780226673097
dc.relation.isPartOfWhy Study Biology by the Sea?en_GB
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the University of Chicago Press via the link in this recorden_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03-12
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren_GB
refterms.dateFCD2020-07-01T14:00:19Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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