Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDupré, John
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-21T14:46:35Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.description.abstractThe widely accepted interactionist picture of human development makes it clear that, given the historical and geographical differences in the cultures in which human develop, we should expect a great historical and geographical diversity of human natures. This makes it advisable not to talk about a singular human nature at all, and consider only diverse human natural histories. This view is reinforced by the contemporary move from preformationist to epigenetic understandings of the role of the genome in development. Among the defects of evolutionary psychologists' claims to delineate a universal human nature is the implicit commitment to an obsolete preformationist view of development. Their misguided project has political dangers as well as epistemological shortcomings.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 13, Issue 2, pp. 109 - 122en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/13853
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherVersita and Springeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.humanaffairs.sk/ha203.htmen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.humanaffairs.sk/index.htmlen_GB
dc.titleOn Human Natureen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-21T14:46:35Z
dc.identifier.issn1210-3055
dc.descriptionpublication-status: Publisheden_GB
dc.descriptiontypes: Articleen_GB
dc.identifier.journalHuman Affairsen_GB


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record