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dc.contributor.authorNyhan, B
dc.contributor.authorReifler, J
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-17T08:54:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-08
dc.description.abstractSeasonal influenza is responsible for thousands of deaths and billions of dollars of medical costs per year in the United States, but influenza vaccination coverage remains substantially below public health targets. One possible obstacle to greater immunization rates is the false belief that it is possible to contract the flu from the flu vaccine. A nationally representative survey experiment was conducted to assess the extent of this flu vaccine misperception. We find that a substantial portion of the public (43%) believes that the flu vaccine can give you the flu. We also evaluate how an intervention designed to address this concern affects belief in the myth, concerns about flu vaccine safety, and future intent to vaccinate. Corrective information adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website significantly reduced belief in the myth that the flu vaccine can give you the flu as well as concerns about its safety. However, the correction also significantly reduced intent to vaccinate among respondents with high levels of concern about vaccine side effects--a response that was not observed among those with low levels of concern. This result, which is consistent with previous research on misperceptions about the MMR vaccine, suggests that correcting myths about vaccines may not be an effective approach to promoting immunization.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVaccine, 2014, Vol. 33, Issue 3, pp. 459 - 464en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.11.017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/21566
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherElsevieren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25499651en_GB
dc.rightsThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Elsevier via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.subjectBeliefen_GB
dc.subjectFluen_GB
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_GB
dc.subjectMisperceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectMythen_GB
dc.subjectVaccineen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescenten_GB
dc.subjectAdulten_GB
dc.subjectAgeden_GB
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subjectBehavior Therapyen_GB
dc.subjectData Collectionen_GB
dc.subjectFemaleen_GB
dc.subjectHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectHumansen_GB
dc.subjectInfluenza A virusen_GB
dc.subjectInfluenza Vaccinesen_GB
dc.subjectInfluenza, Humanen_GB
dc.subjectMaleen_GB
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subjectPatient Acceptance of Health Careen_GB
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_GB
dc.subjectVaccinationen_GB
dc.subjectYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleDoes correcting myths about the flu vaccine work? An experimental evaluation of the effects of corrective information.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2016-05-17T08:54:10Z
dc.identifier.issn0264-410X
exeter.place-of-publicationNetherlands
dc.identifier.journalVaccineen_GB


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