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dc.contributor.authorHeathershaw, JD
dc.contributor.authorOwen, C
dc.contributor.authorCooley, A
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-03T07:26:12Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-01
dc.description.abstractThis paper challenges dominant understandings of ‘rising powers’ by developing a decentred, relational account of Russia and China in Central Asia. We ask whether Moscow and Beijing’s regional integrative strategies do not guide, but are rather led by, everyday interactions among Russian and Chinese actors, and local actors in Central Asia. Rising powers, as a derivative of ‘Great Powers’, are frequently portrayed as structurally comparable units that concentrate power in their executives, fetishize territorial sovereignty, recruit client states, contest regional hegemony, and explicitly oppose the post-1945 international order. In contrast, we demonstrate that the centred discourse of Eurasian integration promoted by Russian and Chinese leaders is decentred by networks of business and political elites, especially with regard to capital accumulation. Adopting Homi K Bhabha’s notion of mimicry (subversion, hybridity) and J.C. Scott’s conception of mētis (local knowledge, agency), and using examples of Russian and Chinese investments and infrastructure projects in Central Asia, we argue that in order to understand centring discourse we must look to decentring practices at the periphery; that is, rising power is produced through on-going interactions between actors at the margins of the state’s hegemonic reach.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
dc.identifier.citationPublished online 01 July 2019.en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01436597.2019.1627867
dc.identifier.grantnumberES/J013056/1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/37341
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder embargo until 01 January 2021 in compliance with publisher policy.en_GB
dc.rights© 2019 Global South Ltd.
dc.subjectRising Poweren_GB
dc.subjectRussiaen_GB
dc.subjectChinaen_GB
dc.subjectCentral Asiaen_GB
dc.subjectState Transformationen_GB
dc.subjectMimicryen_GB
dc.subjectMētisen_GB
dc.titleCentred Discourse, Decentred Practice: The Relational Production of Russian and Chinese 'Rising' Power in Central Asiaen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2019-06-03T07:26:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-6597
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Taylor & Francis (Routledge) via the DOI in this record.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThird World Quarterlyen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-16
exeter.funder::Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_GB
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-05-16
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2019-06-02T19:58:12Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelCen_GB


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