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dc.contributor.authorMihlar, F
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-29T15:04:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-03
dc.description.abstractScholarly work exists on how Muslim minority positioning affects identity and politics, but what is less known is its impact on religion. Sri Lanka’s 9% Muslim population, the country’s second largest minority, has undergone a series of recent changes to religious identity, thinking and practice, which have been shaped by its relationship to the dominant and warring ‘ethnic others’. As Sri Lanka plunged deeper into armed conflict in the 1990s, Muslims experienced significant shifts in religious thinking and practice, identifying strictly with a more ‘authentic’ Islam. After the war ended in 2009, Muslims became the target of majoritarian Sinhala-Buddhist violence, resulting in a reinterpretation of Islam and a counter process of change. Using the Sri Lankan Muslim case study to engage with scholarly critiques of majority–minority binaries, this article analyses how religious change is brought about through the interjection of minority status with ethno-nationalisms and conflict. Its focus on Islam in Sri Lanka contributes to area studies and to Islamic studies, the latter through a rare analysis of Islamic reform in a Muslim minority context.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationPublished online 3 July 2019en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01436597.2019.1632186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/38489
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_GB
dc.rights.embargoreasonUnder embargo until 3 january 2021 in compliance with publisher policyen_GB
dc.rights© 2019 Global South Ltden_GB
dc.subjectIslamic reformen_GB
dc.subjectMuslim minoritiesen_GB
dc.subjectSri Lankaen_GB
dc.subjectconflicten_GB
dc.subjectethno-nationalismen_GB
dc.subjectidentity and Wahhabismen_GB
dc.titleReligious change in a minority context: transforming Islam in Sri Lankaen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2019-08-29T15:04:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-6597
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Taylor & Francis via the DOI in this recorden_GB
dc.identifier.journalThird World Quarterlyen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_GB
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-06-06
rioxxterms.versionAMen_GB
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-03
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_GB
refterms.dateFCD2019-08-29T15:02:15Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.panelCen_GB


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