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dc.contributor.authorLeonelli, Sabina
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-03T15:41:48Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.description.abstractArabidopsis is currently the most popular and well-researched model organism in plant biology. This paper documents this plant's rise to scientific fame by focusing on two interrelated aspects of Arabidopsis research. One is the extent to which the material features of the plant have constrained research directions and enabled scientific achievements. The other is the crucial role played by the international community of Arabidopsis researchers in making it possible to grow, distribute and use plant specimen that embody these material features. I argue that at least part of the explosive development of this research community is due to its successful standardisation and to the subsequent use of Arabidopsis specimen as material models of plants. I conclude that model organisms have a double identity as both samples of nature and artifacts representing nature. It is the resulting ambivalence in their representational value that makes them attractive research tools for biologists.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 29, Issue 2, pp. 193 - 223en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/8982
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherStazione Zoologica Anton Dohrnen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18564512en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hpls-szn.com/en_GB
dc.subjectArabidopsisen_GB
dc.subjectHistory, 20th Centuryen_GB
dc.subjectHumansen_GB
dc.subjectModels, Geneticen_GB
dc.subjectResearchen_GB
dc.titleGrowing weed, producing knowledge: an epistemic history of Arabidopsis thaliana.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2013-05-03T15:41:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0391-9714
exeter.place-of-publicationEngland
dc.identifier.journalHistory of Philosophy of the Life Sciencesen_GB


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