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dc.contributor.authorLudlow, Morwennaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Exeter. At the time of publication the author was at the University of Oxford.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-25T14:26:40Zen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-25T11:45:11Zen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-20T14:16:35Z
dc.date.issued2004-04en_GB
dc.description.abstractHans Denck is commonly cited as a universalist. Probably he was not, but there are several reasons why it was easy for his opponents to claim the opposite: his theology admitted the possibility that all people will be saved; his broadly Origenistic conceptions of freedom, divinisation and punishment tempted opponents to attribute Origen’s idea of universalism to him; and he so challenged the core beliefs of mainstream Reformation theology that his opponents may have found it difficult to understand how he could claim that God wills all to be saved, Christ died for all and all are free, without being universalist.en_GB
dc.identifier.citation55 (2), pp. 257-274en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S002204690400990Xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10036/21494en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://0-journals.cambridge.org.lib.ex.ac.uk/action/displayIssue?jid=ECH&volumeId=55&issueId=02en_GB
dc.subjectDenck, Hansen_GB
dc.subjectOrigenen_GB
dc.subjectuniversalismen_GB
dc.subjectuniversal salvationen_GB
dc.subjectReformationen_GB
dc.titleWhy was Hans Denck thought to be a universalist?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2008-03-25T14:26:40Zen_GB
dc.date.available2011-01-25T11:45:11Zen_GB
dc.date.available2013-03-20T14:16:35Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-0469en_GB
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7637en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Ecclesiastical Historyen_GB


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