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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Narcie
dc.contributor.authorBrandom, Kevin G.
dc.contributor.authorMattick, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T10:14:27Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: New medical graduates are the front-line staff in many hospital settings and manage patients with diabetes frequently. Prescribing is an area of concern for junior doctors, however, with insulin prescribing reported as a particular weakness. This study aimed to produce an educational intervention which aimed to improve preparedness to manage patients with diabetes and evaluate it using a mixed methods approach. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: An e-resource (http://www.diabetesscenariosforjuniordoctors.co.uk) was created to contain commonplace and authentic diabetes decision-making scenarios. -32 junior doctors (n=20) and year 5 students (n=12) in South West England worked through the scenarios while 'thinking aloud' and then undertook a semistructured interview. Qualitative data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically. Participant confidence to manage patients with diabetes before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after the educational intervention was also measured using a self-rating scale. RESULTS: Participants reported that patients with diabetes were daunting to manage because of the wide array of insulin products, their lack of confidence with chronic disease management and the difficulty of applying theory to practice. The e-resource was described as authentic, practical, and appropriate for the target audience. Junior doctors' self-rated confidence to manage patients with diabetes increased from 4.7 (of 10) before using the e-resource, to 6.4 immediately afterwards, and 6.8 6 weeks later. Medical students' confidence increased from 5.1 before, to 6.4 immediately afterwards, and 6.4 6 weeks later. CONCLUSIONS: Providing opportunities to work with authentic scenarios in a safe environment can help to ameliorate junior doctors' lack of confidence to manage patients with diabetes.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by funding from the Diabetes Research and Education Centre Trust (DIRECT) via the Peninsula Foundation.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationVol. 3, article e000116en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjdrc-2015-000116
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10871/19661
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26435838en_GB
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectEducation Researchen_GB
dc.subjectTreatment With Insulinen_GB
dc.titleImproving preparedness of medical students and junior doctors to manage patients with diabetesen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.date.available2016-02-09T10:14:27Z
exeter.place-of-publicationEngland
dc.descriptionJournal Articleen_GB
dc.identifier.eissn2052-4897
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Open Diabetes Research and Careen_GB


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